Tag archives

tuberculosis

Publisher:  World Health Organisation (WHO)

“The World Health Organization (WHO) has updated its guidance for the use of lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay (LAM) in the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). Tests based on the detection of mycobacterial LAM antigen in urine have emerged as potential point-of-care tests for TB. The WHO Global TB Programme recommended the use of LF-LAM for the first time in 2015. Urinary LAM assays have shown greater sensitivity when used for the diagnosis of TB in people living with HIV. The sensitivity increases significantly in patients with lower CD4 cell counts. Following the new evidence, WHO is now recommending LF-LAM use to assist in diagnosis in a broader group of people, both in inpatient and outpatient settings.”

Source: Policy Update


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Publisher:  Results UK

This report aims to define what provision of TB services in “the context of progress towards UHC” looks like in practice, and to what extent the recognition of the codependency of achieving TB and UHC at international fora like the UN and WHO translates to action at ground level. It defines an essential set of services that would both help to make the TB response “universal” and help to make the TB response contribute to the achievement of UHC more broadly.


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TB kills more people than any other infectious disease and is the leading killer of people living with HIV; about one in three deaths among people with HIV are due to TB.

The Global Fund provides 69% of all international financing for tuberculosis (10% of total available resources) and has disbursed US$6.6 billion for TB programs and US$2.1 for TB/ HIV programs as of June 2019. As the leading international funder of TB programs, the Global Fund is a critical partner in achieving the new targets set at the UN High-Level Meeting. 

See the results of these initiative and others in the fight against tuberculosis worldwide in the Global Fund’s Results Report 2019 .

GFAN Speaker Timur Abdullaev shares his insights as an HIV+ person who received lifesaving tuberculosis treatment from a Global Fund program with participants of the RESULTS International Conference. He is confident that we can...


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Publisher: Friends of the Global Fight Against AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

The world has made remarkable progress over the past two decades to address AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, and increased investment can help ensure disease resurgence does not undo these gains. Stepped-up funding for the Global Fund and U.S. bilateral programs is our best defense against future disease resurgence.

The path forward is clear: to end AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, we must scale up prevention and treatment, strengthen surveillance systems and invest in innovation. Drawing on historical examples and empirical evidence about resurgence, this new report demonstrates why it is crucial for U.S. policymakers to invest in the Global Fund.


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Publisher: Global Health: Science and Practice

In the era of declining development assistance for health, transitioning externally funded programs to governments becomes a priority for donors. However, the process requires a careful approach not only to preserve the public health gains that have already been achieved but also to expand on them. In the Eastern Europe and Central Asia region, countries are expected to graduate from support from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria in or before 2025. We aim to describe transition risks and identify possible means to address them.


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Publisher: Journal of the American Medical Association

In 2015, member states of the United Nations adopted the ambitious Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which included 17 global goals that targeted economic and social development.1 Goal 3, “to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages,” targets specifically marked progress in universal health coverage; improved access to safe, effective, and affordable medicines; and the end of the HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis epidemics by 2030.


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