Tag archives

grant-making

Publisher: EANNASO

In recent years, many partners – including many civil society organizations and community groups – have been calling on the Global Fund to develop a clear policy around managing handovers in countries that are no longer eligible for funding. There are several examples of transitions that have not gone smoothly and have threatened the health and rights of key and vulnerable populations


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Publisher: EANNASO

This community guide is a basic overview of the Global Fund’s Gender Equality Strategy.

In this guide you will find:

The vulnerability of women and girls when it comes to HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria What kinds of gender equality elements the Global Fund looks for in proposals The Global Fund’s four strategic objectives to make sure grants address gender inequalities (and what this means for you!)
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Publisher: Aidspan &  APMGlobal Health

This report by Aidspan and APMGlobal Health provides recommendations for countries transitioning from Global Fund and other funding partner support. The authors suggest that transitions need to be based on three sets of principles: (1) transparency and predictability; (2) good practice; and (3) human rights. The section on transparency and predictability describes the need for systematic transition criteria, publicly available transition schedules, and coordinated donor decisions. In the section on good practice, the paper explains the need for adequate time, high-level country commitment, country ownership of the process, and built-in monitoring and evaluation. The section on human rights discusses how transitions can protect and promote human rights by maintaining and expanding access to essential HIV services for key populations. This is done through creating funding mechanisms for NGOs and inc...


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Publisher: Aidspan

This is a report emanating from a case study analysis by Aidspan of how The Global Fund’s willingness-to-pay policy leveraged additional government resources in the new funding model. The purpose of the study was to increase transparency around the Fund’s WTP policy, especially how it was operationalized at country level. The report provides quantitative and qualitative data on a small number of country case studies, detailing how much money countries committed as part of WTP, and what they committed to spend that money on. The study also describes how these commitments were obtained, including who participated in the process and any challenges which were encountered. Finally, the study describes how the WTP has contributed to spending on key populations, and how it impacted transition processes in upper-middle-income countries.


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Publisher:  African Journal of AIDS Research , 1608-5906 (Print) 1727-9445

Immense progress has been made in the fight against HIV and AIDS. Achieving and exceeding the AIDS targets for the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) was accomplished, in large part, due to an unprecedented financial investment from the international community. Following an $800 million dip in donor disbursements in 2010, the discourse has since shifted to the need for greater sustainability of funding. But what does sustainability mean? Current efforts focus heavily on fiscal imperatives such as increasing domestic funding. This is important – needs are increasing at a faster rate than donor funding, especially with increased treatment coverage. The problem is that measures of financial sustainability tell very little about the actual sustainability of specific programmes, disease trajectories or enabling environments. Recognising that current definitions of sustainability lack...


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Publisher: Center for Global Development

This report addresses the how of next generation financing models—that is, the concrete steps needed to change the basis of payment from expenses to something else: outputs, outcomes, or impact.

Part I offers a conceptual framework that explains why traditional grantmaking often gets the incentives wrong, why that matters, and how next generation financing models might offer a way for the Global Fund and other health funders to increase the value for money of their investments. It also describes the growing use of incentives at the Global Fund and elsewhere, including the current incentives embedded within Global Fund grants.

Part II discusses contexts where a move to next generation grant models could drive faster impact or other benefits for the Global Fund and describes the technical elements and design choices required to bring them to life.

Part III “puts it all together,” providing four illu...


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