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domestic-financing

Publisher: TB Europe Coalition There is a need for sustainable transition to domestic funding, ensuring that TB and HIV programmes will be effectively continued, and more importantly scaled up, after the withdrawal of international donors, with national governments taking the responsibility and ownership of the response. Transition is a complex process and demands significant structural adjustments, effective planning, implementation and monitoring. All this requires long-term planning, as well as additional and more effective use of resources This is why TBEC is publishing a comprehensive position paper that outlines the main challenges that needs to be taken into account when countries are transitioning, with concrete examples about what happens when countries are not able or not ready to take over from external donor support, causing negative impacts on the TB response.
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Publisher: Aidspan &  APMGlobal Health This report by Aidspan and APMGlobal Health provides recommendations for countries transitioning from Global Fund and other funding partner support. The authors suggest that transitions need to be based on three sets of principles: (1) transparency and predictability; (2) good practice; and (3) human rights. The section on transparency and predictability describes the need for systematic transition criteria, publicly available transition schedules, and coordinated donor decisions. In the section on good practice, the paper explains the need for adequate time, high-level country commitment, country ownership of the process, and built-in monitoring and evaluation. The section on human rights discusses how transitions can protect and promote human rights by maintaining and expanding access to essential HIV services for key populations. This is done through creating funding mechanisms for NGOs and inc...
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Publisher:  Tanzania Council for Social Development This is an overview from a meeting held on 27th February 2015 on the current state of domestic financing in Tanzania and actions that need to be taken.
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Publisher:  Friends of the Global Fight Against AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria This report highlights ways in which Global Fund implementing countries are increasing domestic investments in health. The report, titled Innovation for Greater Impact: Exploring Resources for Domestic Health Funding in Africa, illustrates how, through a variety of approaches, African governments are mobilizing additional resources to fight HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. Many countries are already taking important steps in this direction. Six African countries – Liberia, Malawi, Rwanda, Swaziland, Togo and Zambia – are on track to reach the agreed Abuja target of allocating 15 percent of government spending on health. Such countries, on average, spend 20 times more of their own resources on health than they receive in assistance. Several countries included in Friends’ report are exploring ways to mobilize new revenue through i...
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Publisher: The Lancet , Volume 3, No. 1, e52–e61, January 2015 As the incomes of many AIDS-burdened countries grow and donors’ budgets for helping to fight the disease tighten, national governments and external funding partners increasingly face the following question: what is the capacity of countries that are highly affected by AIDS to finance their responses from domestic sources, and how might this affect the level of donor support? In this study, we attempt to answer this question. Nearly all 12 countries studied fall short of the proposed expenditure benchmarks. If they met these benchmarks fully, domestic spending on AIDS would increase by 2.5 times, from US$2.1 billion to $5.1 billion annually, covering 64% of estimated future funding requirements and leaving a gap of around a third of the total $7.9 billion needed. Although upper-middle-income countries, such as Botswana, Namibia, and South Africa, would become financial...
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Publisher: Centre for International Governance Innovation At least US$87 billion is needed to support the prevention, care and treatment of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis (TB) and malaria in low- and middle-income African countries between 2014 and 2016. Much of the financing for these diseases previously came from international sources; however, implementing countries are progressively graduating from international support as their economies grow. The authors of the brief, Alan Whiteside and Samantha Bradshaw, explain that in order to reach the US$87 billion target, national governments need to mobilize more domestic resources and increase spending on health. They recommend that health ministers in Africa work with international donors, development partners and their own respective national governments to mobilize domestic resources and advocate health spending in the context of shared responsibility and individualized needs.